Mass. shelters step up to help animals impacted by Hurricane Ida | News

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Hurricane Ida forced many down south to evacuate their homes and leave many pets behind. To help, area shelters had to make sure they were empty, so they could house these animals temporarily and reunite them with their owners, but that means the dogs already in the shelters – had to leave.







SPRINGFIELD, MA (WGGB/WSHM) — Hurricane Ida forced many down south to evacuate their homes and leave many pets behind. To help, area shelters had to make sure they were empty, so they could house these animals temporarily and reunite them with their owners, but that means the dogs already in the shelters had to leave. That’s why three pups traveled all the way from Louisiana to western Massachusetts.

Hurricane Ida barreled through Louisiana and left the streets flooded and local shelters also flooded with animals.

“Dakin did send staff to New Orleans to actually help a New Orleans shelter because, as you can imagine, they were overrun,” said Carmine Dicenso, executive director of Dakin Humane Society.

Several shelters in the area worked together to get the dogs out of shelters down south, so they could make room ahead of the storm.

“People may be displaced from their homes meaning the area shelters may need to take in a dog temporarily, so they can be reunited with their animals locally. In order for them to do that, they need to empty out any animals that they currently have in the shelter,” DiCenso noted.

DiCenso told Western Mass News they partnered with a shelter in Salem, which helped transport the dogs and Dakin got three – Hannah, Harriett, and Winnie.

“Any animal that’s coming from out of state, there are requirements. They needed to be isolated for 48 hours or actually quarantined for 48 hours and after that, a veterinarian would examine them make sure they are healthy and if they are they can be released and be adopted…They had already been in that shelter in Louisiana for a little bit, so they were in pretty good shape. They’d been under the care, they’d been vaccinated,” DiCenso noted.

DiCenso said the most important thing is making sure the dogs brought here don’t already have homes back where they were picked up.

“We’re really cautious about the animals we take in when it’s a disaster because you can imagine people have to evacuate their homes then to lose their animals would be tragic. We do not want to break up families,” DiCesno added.

Hannah is currently in a foster-to-adopt home, while Winnie has many applications in for her and will also be adopted soon. As for Harriett, she has to undergo a few medical tests and then she’ll also be put up for adoption.





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