The 'Unhealthiest' City In Massachusetts


Massachusetts usually ranks at the top of the list when it comes to healthy states in the country. The commonwealth is ranked number one in health care.

When it comes to health insurance coverage and access to care, the top-performing states in 2023 were Massachusetts, Hawaii, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and the District of Columbia. Massachusetts reported the nation’s lowest adult uninsured rate, 3.4 percent. –commonwealthfund.org

Vice President Harris, Senator Markey Join SEIU Airport Workers At Boston Labor Day

Getty Images for SEIU

The Most ‘Unhealthy’ City in Massachusetts

Springfield, MA

Springfield is city of about 155,000 in the western part of the state and has been named the most unhealthy municipality, according to 247wallst.com.

Special School Helps Kids Combat Childhood Obesity

Getty Images

Adults in fair or poor health: 12.9% (state: 10.8%)
> Adult smoking rate: 15.4% (state: 11.4%)
> Adult obesity rate: 29.2% (state: 24.5%)
> Median household income: $65,520 (state: $89,645)

Unhealthy lifestyle attributes

  • Smoking
  • Alcohol
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Poor diet
  • High levels of stressors that lead to anxiety, depression

U.S. To Support Anti-Smoking Treaty

Getty Images
  • Potential life lost per 100,000 individuals: 9,900 (compared to the state average of 5,600)
  • Adults reporting fair or poor health: 23.9% (compared to the state average of 13.6%)
  • Adults afflicted by obesity: 32.6% (compared to the state average of 24.4%)
  • Physically inactive adults: 26.9% (compared to the state average of 18.9%)

Britons Most Obese In Europe

Getty Images

I quit smoking cigarettes at 37, drinking alcohol at 42, and using cannabis at 43. Abstaining from these intoxicants improved my health dramatically. Your body can only take so much abuse.

Surrounding yourself and having access to better lifestyle choices is paramount for longevity. Sometimes bigger cities with a lower income level can contribute to poor  health.

The 10 Leading Causes of Death in Massachusetts

10. Chronic Liver Disease/Cirrhosis

The main factors that lead to this are viruses, obesity, and alcohol misuse.

9. Kidney Disease

Diabetes and high blood pressure are the main causes of kidney disease.

8. Alzheimer’s Disease

The causes probably include a combination of age-related changes in the brain, along with genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

travellinglight

travellinglight

7. Diabetes

Type 1 you’re born with, type 2 you develop with poor diet choices and physical inactivity.

Hand pouring sugar from spoon isolated on blue background

LoveTheWind

6. Stroke

There are two main causes of stroke, a blocked artery (ischemic stroke) or leaking or bursting of a blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke).

5. Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases

Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Flu, and more all contribute to this conditions .

4. Accidents

Pedestrian deaths were up 35% last year (2022).

Cities with the Most Accidents

Shutterstock

3. Covid-19

The pandemic was still high on the list of leading causes of death in Massachusetts.

2. Heart Disease

Leading risk factors for heart disease and stroke are high blood pressure, high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and secondhand smoke exposure, obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity.

group of young hospital workers in scrubs

michaeljung

1. Cancer

Breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancers, in that order, are the top types of diagnosed disease in Massachusetts and nationally.

An estimated 12,500 people will die of cancer in 2023 in Massachusetts. The above data courtesy of cdc.gov

breast cancer exercise woman

iStock

These 50 US Cities are Crawling with Bed Bugs

Every year the pest control gurus at Orkin put together a list of the Top 50 Bed Bug Destinations in the United States. Which areas do you travel to that you should take extra care to watch out for these blood-sucking insects? Let’s countdown to the most bed-bug-riddled city in the United States.

Gallery Credit: Scott Clow

window.twttr = (function(d, s, id) {
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],
t = window.twttr || {};
if (d.getElementById(id)) return t;
js = d.createElement(s);
js.id = id;
js.src = “https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
t._e = [];
t.ready = function(f) {
t._e.push(f);
};
return t;
}(document, “script”, “twitter-wjs”));
(function(d, s, id) {
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *