PANDEMIC effect on weather events: Lightnings decreased by one in 5

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PANDEMIC effect on weather events: Lightnings decreased by one in 5

According to a new study conducted in the USA, it was stated that the PANDEMIC quarantine significantly reduced the risk of lightning strikes. In the study, it was stated that small particles called aerosols in the atmosphere contribute to lightning and human activities such as using fossil fuels release aerosols. In the study, which stated that the aerosol concentration in the atmosphere decreased during the pandemic, it was emphasized that the number of lightning decreased by 19 percent in 2020 compared to 2018.

A new study has been published on the reason for less lightning strikes during the pandemic process in the USA.

In a study by Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists, it was stated that in 2020, especially in the spring, the pandemic caused curfews in many parts of the world and people used less energy.

It was reported that the air and water breathed became cleaner due to people spending more time in their homes.

In the findings of the study, it was emphasized that small particles called aerosols in the atmosphere contribute to lightning and that human activities such as using fossil fuels release aerosols.

In the published research, it was underlined that as people release less aerosols during quarantine, the concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere decreases, which significantly reduces lightning events.

Meteorologist Earle Williams at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who presented the research, said the team used three different methods to measure lightning.

“All results showed the same trend that a decreasing aerosol concentration was associated with decreased lightning activity,” Williams said.

While it was emphasized that some aerosols in the atmosphere can collect water vapor and form cloud droplets, Williams said that when there are more aerosols, the water vapor in the cloud is dispersed among a greater number of droplets, so the droplets are smaller and less likely to turn into larger rain droplets.

CAR EFFECT ON LIGHTNINGS

When countries were quarantined at the start of the pandemic, production fell at fossil fuel-fired power plants as humans released fewer aerosols into the atmosphere.

Stating that people also reduce fossil fuel consumption by driving less, Williams said, “Automobile traffic has a great effect on aerosol production.”

Similarly, the research underlined that pollution from air travel has decreased significantly, and it was stated that the number of lightning strikes decreased by 19 percent in 2020 compared to the same quarter of 2018.

‘A GREAT REDUCTION OF 19 PERCENT’

“It’s a pretty big 19 percent decrease,” Williams said, adding that Southeast Asia, Europe and Africa experienced the biggest declines, while the Americas were less affected by the decrease compared to other continents.

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